Artist Profile: Eddie McMenemy

Allyson Hamblett profiles fellow artist, Eddie McMenemy

 

Eddie in the studio

Eddie in the studio

Eddie McMenemy has been coming to Māpura Studios since the beginning of 2018.  He attends Leading a Creative Life class on Thursday morning, and is certainly a character.

Leading a Creative Life provides a supportive, instructive and stimulating environment for people living with stroke-affect (or similar disability), to develop a strong visual arts practice. Twice a term there will be a workshop or a tutorial that focuses on the learning requirements of the group and individual learning needs; once a term a guest ‘professional’ artist will present on their arts practice. The remaining time is ‘open studio’ where participants work independently and are self-directed in their choice of content and subject matter. Tutors provide ongoing input regarding methodologies, techniques, media and guidance re subject matter so artists are supported in the ongoing progression of their art making capabilities and knowledge base.

Eddie’s art practice is shaped by his life experiences and just emerge from his mind.  Eddie never knew he could paint, but has become a prolific artist since attending classes at Māpura.  He continues his art practice at home and often shows fellow class mates those creative endeavours as well as the ones he makes at Māpura Studio.    One particular recent work was entitled Arohanui; the timing of which, was particularly poignant for New Zealand. 

Eddie has exhibited his work at Pah Homestead through the Māpura Exhibition Programme, and entered one of his works into IHC Art Awards in 2018.  He became a finalist and won the award with his work, “Buddha”.

Originally from Glasgow, Eddie was a musician in fifties and sixties. He worked with people such as Tom Jones and Englebert Humperdink.  Eddie’s stage name was Eddie Clifford, and started Eddie Clifford and the Blackjacks in 1958.

 

Eddie McMenenemy, Arohanui.JPG
Eddie McMenemy, Purple Rain, 2018

Eddie McMenemy, Purple Rain, 2018

Eddie McMenemy - The Phaoroah web.jpg

Artist Profile: Natalie Heitmann

Allyson Hamblett profiles fellow artist, Natalie Heitmann

Natalie Heitmann has been attending Māpura Studios for two and a half years.  She goes to the Leading a Creative Life class on Thursday morning.

Natalie.jpg

Leading a Creative Life provides a supportive, instructive and stimulating environment for people living with stroke-affect (or similar disability), to develop a strong visual arts practice. Twice a term there will be a workshop or a tutorial that focuses on the learning requirements of the group and individual learning needs; once a term a guest ‘professional’ artist will present on their arts practice. The remaining time is ‘open studio’ where participants work independently and are self directed in their choice of content and subject matter. Tutors provide on going input regarding methodologies, techniques, media and guidance re subject matter so artists are supported in the on going progression of their art making capabilities and knowledge base.

Natalie likes creating “All things related to memory – Georgian landscapes and family.  The stroke caused me to lose the ability to play the piano.   I was a concert pianist.  Painting and drawing allows me to access some of the feelings that music brought me”

Georgia’s Blessing

Georgia’s Blessing

Natalie is inspired to make art by “The ability to express my feelings.  I used to express my feelings through playing the piano.  Now I can do this through painting and drawing.”

Natalie has been creative “from very early childhood.  I started playing the piano when I was 6 or so.  My father dreamed he would have a child who was musical.”

Natalie makes art at home, as well as Māpura.

Artist Profile: Grant Dallow

Grant Dallow in Mapura Studios

Grant Dallow in Mapura Studios

Grant Dallow began at Mapura, attending Artilespy class, which stopped a couple of years ago.  “So bought my guitar for music therapy on Wednesday and the stroke group on Thursday.”

 Grant used to enjoy abstract painting and was inspired by “French Impressionism”

 Grant has been creative since “When I began to concentrate not only on medication, but quality of life being an equally important factor”

“Not much at the moment, but expecting the Louvre to phone up any time soon”

ARTIST STATEMENT: Bryan Lee

Bryan Lee, Flowers, 2018

Bryan Lee, Flowers, 2018

Bryan Lee has been at Māpura Studios for 2 and a half years.  He likes to draw cartoon characters and paint them.  Bryan likes being able to paint with paint or to colour in with crayon or coloured pencils. 

Bryan has been creative at a very young age.  He started colouring picture books, then went on to shapes and sometimes abstract.  He also liked finger / hand painting.

“Yes, I do art with my buddy every Saturday.  We draw a picture, following the Art Hub on Youtube and then paint the picture.”

Bryan Lee, Chinese Lantern, 2018

Bryan Lee, Chinese Lantern, 2018

Artist Profile: Colin Harris

Allyson Hamblett profiles fellow artist, Colin Harris

Collin Harris in the studio

Collin Harris in the studio

Collin Harris has been attending Mapura Studios since 2018.  He likes screen printing, abstract works, figures and masks.  He likes the creative atmosphere at Mapura, and the creative input by the tutors.

Colin has been creative since the age of 10, through school.  He enjoys taking photos and does a lot of drawing when he’s not at the Studio. 

Colin attends Studio Practice on Wednesday morning at Mapura Studios.  Studio Practice is aimed at our more experienced, long-term artists. They work in a self-directed manner, identifying and developing ideas of their own choosing; they are encouraged to gather resources and undertake simple research towards their work. Many of the artists become very enthused about this – and are dedicated in their research, exploring new ideas and ways of working not only in the studio but at home.

Colin Harris, Two Brothers, 2018

Colin Harris, Two Brothers, 2018

 Colin gets inspiration for his art works by looking at what other Mapura artists create,  and just goes with the flow when he’s at Studio Practice.  Mapura feels like a family atmosphere and is very supportive.  Since attending Mapura Studios, Colin has more confidence and more outgoing.  It’s been great for his health, meeting new people.

 Currently Colin likes to create faces and masks on paper with oil sticks, pastels and ink.  Each work is vibrant and unique.

Colin, Allyson Hamblett, 2019

Colin, Allyson Hamblett, 2019

Colin Harris, Still Life Masks, 2018

Colin Harris, Still Life Masks, 2018

Colin is now creating larger paintings, and loves seeing his work exhibited.  Colin also volunteers to support artists in the Leading a Creative Life class on Thursday morning.  Colin feels that Mapura is a great space to explore creative ideas.

Artist Profile: Matthew Tucker

 Allyson Hamblett profiles fellow artist Matthew Tucker

 

Matthew Tucker has always loved numbers and patterns and he’s been able to develop this passion by creating geometric paintings at Mapura Studios for   13 years.  His paintings are abstact, but very structured and detailed.

Matthew Tucker

Matthew Tucker

He first started art at Mt Roskill Grammar School.  “I started when I was at secondary school.  I did 5 years of that.    At school, I had an hour a week, whereas here, because I’m here twice a week I have 4 and a half hours per week.”

Matthew attends Studio Practice on Wednesday morning and Open Studio One on Tuesday morning.

Studio Practice is aimed at our more experienced, long-term artists. They work in a self directed manner, identifying and developing ideas of their own choosing; they are encouraged to gather resources and undertake simple research towards their work. Many of the artists become very enthused about this – and are dedicated in their research, exploring new ideas and ways of working not only in the studio but at home

Matthew Tucker, Floating Dots, 2018

Matthew Tucker, Floating Dots, 2018

Open Studio One offers a supportive, empathetic learning environment for artists to develop a sense of creative community and be involved in meaningful creative industry.  Art tutors / therapists encourage artists to be self-directed, to explore content of personal interest and significance, and to develop their own, unique style.   

Recently, Matthew has started doing art at home using a sketchbook and pencil. 

Matthew Tucker, Fiesta, 2018

Matthew Tucker, Fiesta, 2018

Matthew loves seeing his art exhibited through the Mapura Studios Exhibition Programme.  “It feels fabulous.  I feel as if I’m wanted in the art world”, says Matthew. 

"I’d tell them that ultimately I have great fun completing art.  I’d also tell them I enjoy the company.  I’d also tell them that I exhibit a lot and I’m famous (laughs).  I have no idea how they would react. "